Buying Opendoor Today Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997

Stock Market

[Editor’s note: “Buying Opendoor Today Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” was previously published in October 2021. It has since been updated to include the most relevant information available.]

Anyone who follows me knows this: I’m super bullish on Opendoor (NASDAQ:OPEN) stock.

The Opendoor (OPEN) website is open on a smartphone that is resting on top of a map.

Source: Tada Images / Shutterstock.com

Indeed, buying Opendoor stock today could be like buying Amazon (Nasdaq:AMZN) stock back in 1997, before it ruled retail.

From where I sit, Opendoor makes a rather compelling case. In fact, I’ve researched this company top to bottom, inside and out. I see Opendoor becoming the “Amazon of houses” over the coming decade — and taking over the multi-trillion-dollar housing market.

In that case, Opendoor stock will soar in the 2020s like Amazon stock did in the 2010s.

A graph depicting the change in Amazon stock price between 2012 and 2018

I could go on and on about why I think this will happen. Of course, I’ve done my homework here. We’re talking months upon months of research.

But at the end of the day, the bull thesis can be boiled down to a few sentences.

The Quick Bull Thesis

The real estate market is stuck in the Stone Age. In a world dominated by direct-to-consumer digital processes, buying and selling home remains an oddly physical process.

It’s filled with excessive profit-taking middlemen that make the process slower, more expensive, and more complex than it should be…

Therefore, there exists a huge opportunity to digitize and streamline the home-shopping process. It can be done directly and digitally, between just two parties — and no one else.

That means the process can become fast, cheap, and easy.

This direct process of buying and selling homes is called iBuying.

It’s relatively new, but the adoption of iBuying is starting to soar in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consumer hesitancy to online shopping has been all but eliminated. And the technologies underlying iBuying’s efficacy — including streaming quality and data-driven pricing algorithms — have dramatically improved.

We see iBuying today where e-commerce was in the late 1990s — in the early stages of enormous, disruptive growth.

And in the iBuying world, Opendoor reigns supreme, without much competition. The company is the biggest iBuyer and operates in the most markets with the most cash. And it has the most talented team and the best technologies, including the best consumer UX and pricing algorithms.

How do I know this? Well, because I personally led the sale of a home to Opendoor, and it was as easy as selling an item on eBay (Nasdaq:EBAY).

The Final Word on Opendoor Stock

In any event, Opendoor is to iBuying what Amazon is to e-commerce. Amazon pioneered the global e-commerce takeover and scored shareholders enormous returns. And over the next decade, Opendoor will do the same in iBuying.

So… if you missed out on Amazon… here’s your chance to scoop up Amazon 2.0.

Our conviction on Opendoor stock is so high that we made it one of our Top 10 stocks in our flagship investment research advisory, Innovation Investor.

In it, we invest exclusively in the world’s most innovative companies, disruptive megatrends, and breakthrough technologies.

And in that portfolio of world-changers, we’ve identified our highest-conviction long-term picks.

Opendoor is one of those stocks.

But it’s only one of the stocks in our portfolio. So, what are the others?

I’ll give you a hint. It’s a tech startup at the epicenter of the multi-trillion-dollar self-driving revolution. And long-term, it could soar even more than Opendoor.

If buying Opendoor stock today is like buying Amazon stock back in 1997, then buying this stock today is like buying Tesla (Nasdaq:TSLA) back in 2013.

What’s the name?

All you need to do is join Innovation Investor to get the full list — and a whole lot more.

On the date of publication, Luke Lango did not have (either directly or indirectly) any positions in the securities mentioned in this article.

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